About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
MSNBCW 19
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19
and saying that a ceasefire will be announced in cairo this evening. israeli radio reporting that the ceasefire could be declared during secretary clinton's visit to jerusalem. she left from southeast asia where she has been traveling with the president. her diplomatic mission is the most direct engagement yet in these negotiations. >> her visits will build on the engagement that we've undertaken over the last several days including the engagement by president obama and secretary clinton with leaders in the region and to support a de-escalation of the violence. >> president obama himself was on the phone in the early hours of the morning trying to prevent the conflict from escalating into a ground war. explosions and smoke clouds dotted the skyline in gaza again as soon as the sun was up. more than 100 people are now confirmed dead there with dozens of children among those killed. more rockets from gaza landing in southern israel today. one sent flying in the direction of jerusalem. israeli police said more than 60 rockets were fired by midday. thousands of israeli reservists
krueger. clashes in cairo today, more protests in tahrir square against egypt's president morsi. we'll have a live report. move over george clooney the on yan's kim junge un the sexiest man alive and beijing doesn't get the joke. good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. no joke today on capitol hill. ambassador susan rice's attempt to clear the air with republicans over benghazi did not work as the white house had hoped. senators mccain, ayotte and graham say they have more questions than they had before rice's comments about benghazi. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get it. >> if you don't know what happened just say you don't know what happened. people can push you to give explanations and you can say i don't want to give bad information. >> that's troubling to me as well, why she wouldn't have asked, i'm the person that doesn't know anything about this, i'm going on every single show. >> joining me now for our daily fix, chris cizilla, msnbc contributor managing editor of post politics.com and our own nbc capito
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
. >>> egypt is poised for more demonstrations in cairo tomorrow over a new constitutional crisis. president muhammed morsi's challenge to the judiciary involving holdovers from the mubarak regime and raulong traditions. joining me is ambassador dennis ross. thank you so much. good to see you. >> you too. >> egypt. now, perhaps morsi felt empowered by his role as a peacemaker on gaza, but he ran right into long-standing traditions. >> he did. he did. i think bear in mind a couple of things. number one, he felt that the role he played made him a central figure in the region as a whole. in mubarak's last few years, the fact was mubarak was increasingly on the sidelines, not playing a major role in the middle east. here's president morsi thinking he can play on the image they are a leader in the region and he can use that as a device to make a move internally. he made that move but i think it's a clear miscalculation because he took on the independents of the judiciary. it doesn't matter that. these were leaders who were holdovers from the mubarak regime, they still represented a symbol of inde
is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. hamas was going to remain defiant in the face of israel's aggression on its people. alex? >> okay. thank you very much for the latest from gaza. we go from there to israel. nbc's martin fletcher is standing by in te
in the west bank, meaning with the palestinian authority, then in cairo could nudge along the process to see if they could get to a point of some sort of negotiated cease-fire. as far as the united states is concerned, what spokesperson said, that begins with hamas stopping the rocket fire into israel and then a longer negotiated settlement, they hope, can be agreed upon. >> chuck todd live in cambodia. thanks so much. as chuck was just talking about, secretary of state hillary clinton is going to be heading directly from cambodia to israel to try to help work out a diplomatic solution to the violent escalation of tensions in gaza. nbc's chapman bell is live with us for the situation there. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as calls for a cease-fire grow, the violence does continue. overnight the israeli defense force attacked 100 targets inside the gaza strip they say are necessary to stop this flow of rockets, underground rocket launchers and weapons depots as well as financial institutions to hamas. now, this morning, though, militants within the gaza strip responded with volleys o
option would be a ground invasion, tamron. >> martin, thank you very much. in cairo today thousands gather to protest the gaza air strikes demanding that the egyptian government cut ties with israel. that's a development in the region. let's bring in "time" magazine international editor jim frederick. you heard the reports with me. martin fletcher indicating that perhaps not even net uh-hy neta anyone knows what the next phase will be? >> the next 48 hours are critical because the deputy foreign minister basically threatened hamas. you might have a ground offensive. the very important thing to keep our eye on over the next 48 hours is that yippian president morsi is meeting with the prime minister from turkey. they're meeting in cairo. these are two crucial countries. on one hand you have -- they're both large populations. historic allally they're wester friendly. they're anchors between israel and their neighbors. he's probably the most distinguished and elder statementsmen in the region, and morsi is new and democratically elected and trying to make his mark as a statesman himself
to meet with leaders in jerusalem as well as cairo and ramallah. few details have been provided in a news conference an hour ago. >> we are all hoping for a deescalation and we are all hoping for restoration of calm, and we are all hoping to open space, for deeper, broader conversations. >> now, the death and the destruction caused by the crisis stretches across both borders. more than 100 confirmed killed in gaza. four in israel including an israeli soldier who died in a rocket strike today. we want to get more from nbc correspondent, ayman mohyeldin, who joins me from gaza. you reached out to the egyptian authorities about what's taking place, when this deal will be announced. what are you hearing about the possibility of that happening this hour? >> well, right now what we're hearing from egyptian officials is that they're still working to finalize that agreement. there are some areas where the gap between the two sides has been narrowed, but there are still some very important issues that have not been addressed. you know, we are talking about trying to solve one of the most complex i
but they will he can press a complaint with cairo, the government that sponsored this truce and they will record their complaint that a violation has happened. alex? >> has this done anything to quell all the celebrations that were going on there in gaza? >> reporter: well, there were celebrations all throughout the day on thursday. yesterday hamas declared it a victory. the palestinian factions held military parade. there weren't many rallies expected today though it is friday prayers here. a lot of mosques throughout the territory did celebrate the victory that occurred as a result of the eight days of fighting. but right now there are no celebrations taking place or rallies though the mood here is relatively calm. people are going about their business as usual despite this violation. alex? >> all right, ayman, many thanks from that. to gaza to israel and tel aviv. special correspondent martin fletcher is joining us. martin, with a good friday to you. let's talk about what israeli forces have done having announced they've made several arrests in wednesday's bus bombing there in tel aviv. what'
is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. "we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved" said this protester. morsi told the supporters he had to take radical measures to protect the revolution. and fast-track a new constitution being wr
in jerusalem. palestinian authorities in ramallah and later travel to cairo where officials are said to be proposing for a truce. >>> egyptian president mohamed morsi is seen as a critical player. he met yesterday with u.n. secretary ban ki-moon. turkey's prime minister complicated matters when he reefr referred to israel as a terrorist state after attending talks in egypt. president obama spoke by phone yesterday to both morsi and netanyahu during his trip to southeast asia. in gaza hamas is calling for israel to stop killing its leaders and end a six-year blockade. meanwhile, new explosions continued through palestinian territory. they say they targeted the national islamic bank which they accuse hamas of using to pay its employees. an nbc analysis found israel has killed nearly 40 hamas militants over the last week, often using high precision drone strikes but the civilian toll has been high as well. thousands of people turned out for the funerals of four young children killed in an israeli air strike. meanwhile, israel's so-called iron dome missile defense has helped keep most mi
washington and cairo and, of course, jerusalem, too. a lot of pressure is coming from america but at the same time, america has said to israel before this all started, almost gave them the green light really saying america agreed that israel needs to do what it needs to do to defend itself so that was giving israel the permission to respond to what after all was a hundred palestinian rockets fired into israel in five days before israel retaliated. >> all right. nbc's martin fletcher. we appreciate the report and obviously stay safe for us over there. >>> also this morning, general petraeus, retired david petraeus red heading to capitol hill where he'll testify. he is expected to focus on the time line of exactly when the agency knew the attack on the american consulate was an act of terrorism and not a protest gone wrong as first suggested. in a close session yesterday members of the house and senate intelligence committee saw for the first time surveillance video and drone recordings of the attack as it unfolded. public hearing on benghazi apparently are in the works general petraeus still d
-fire for israel and hamas. any details have yet to be worked out. the next direct talks happen in k cairo. meanwhile, the military is not commenting on the long oh-range rockets, the same type that were fired into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in
egypt might go in all of this? >> i think egypt, look, it's quarter to a third of the arab world. cairo is one of the historical centers of the arab world. we don't have a good reading on where these guys are going, the muslim brotherhood. i'm not sure they necessarily do. we don't know how much to take literally what they say and write. they've got their internal politics, the party, the government. there's issues between them and other forces in egypt. they came into government fairly narrowly. but they're clearly trying to deepen their base. so everyone's watching really closely what they're doing with the rewriting of egypt's constitution, how these people want to consolidate power. what they say in the middle east, it's one thing to win an election. that's the easy part. are they willing to lose an election, to set up a political dynamic where there's a level playing field? i don't think we know the answer. >> whenever we're talking israel and hamas, you have to think about iran and its role. some of the long-range missile sites they bombed yesterday in those 50 strikes had bombs s
was certainly in sky r cairo and tunisia and other places. is this partly a victim of what's happened for the arab spring, the impetus for change has moved on? >> i don't think it necessarily has to do with the arab spring really. to be honest with you, what's been lacking is courage of leadership. we've seen in the international level, international diplomatic level, large agreements on what needs to be done to move this situation forward except for the united states which has played unfortunately a very obstructive role in international forums, objecting to, you know, preventing israeli settlement expansion when it comes to moving, you know, the negotiations forward and so on. so, you know, we need to could some soul searching here in washington to -- about what role we can play. the first and most important thing i think we can do is tell both sides, particularly now the israelis who we have connections with, that this needs to stop immediately. >> but finally how can you get the hamas to guarantee that the rockets will stop firing towards jerusalem and tel aviv? >> if you look at
this is the epicenter of the violence that is taking place, all eyes are in cairo, egypt. the head of egypt's intelligence has met with lead others palestinian factions. they say they're committed to a ceasefire under two conditions. one is that israel promises or at least pledges or guarantees that it will not resume targeted assassination and the deliberate killing of palestinian leaders and a lifting of the blockade and siege that has been imposed on gaza since 2006, which has restricted the free movement of people and goods and has really created a humanitarian crisis here. so they want to see that siege lifted. the egyptian, we understand, are expected to or may have actually communicated that to the israelis. and so it is now dependent on whether or not they can get the two sides to a cessation of hostilities, and when that time frame would unfold. so there is still no clear official timeline or clear answer, and no clear commitment from either side. but those interest demands as we understand them as they are being negotiated from the palestinian side. >> all right. live in gaza, tha
everywhere. >>> giving you a look at these new protests happening right now in cairo's tahrir square. supporters and opponents of egypt's new president, mohamed morsi, are staging raval rallies after he assumed new powers this week including putting himself above judicialry. president morsi is speaking at the presidential palace saying egypt needs to stay unified. >>> also, some new video to share this hour. walmart workers protesting in it landover, maryland. hundreds of employees have planned protests over low wages and benefits. >>> well, this was the scene in los angeles wednesday night. you are about to see these miles and miles upon traffic literally stuck on the 405 freeway, a very ugly start to the holiday travel season. look at all those red and white christmas colors. no, not so much. and whether you are about to head back home after traveling for the holiday or stayed at home, chances are you still have some travel slated before the year's end and if you don't there might be reason to get away. so joining me now is brian kelly founder of the pointsguide.com. brian, i'm gla
needed to be there in person. she'll travel to israel first and then ramallah in the west bank and cairo to try to curtail the violence. >> clinton will emphasize the united states interests in a peaceful outcome. an outcome that can lead to improved conditions for the civilian residents of gaza. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted
normal force. >>> and we have brand-new video from cairo where the arab league is holding emergency meetings on the crisis. also today the white house urged diplomacy and a deescalation in the violence. let's get right to it on the ground and inside gaza where rockets are flying overhead. nbc's news correspondent is there for us live. let's get to what's happening right up now around you. >> reporter: well let's start off here with the situation in gaza. right now it is really quiet behind me. the streets of gaza are really empty. most people this time of night go to their homes. the streets are pretty much quiet. people here really bracing themselves for what the night usually brings. what we've seen over the course of the last several nights is an intense aerial campaign by the israeli forces. as you mentioned yesterday, the palestinian prime minister's office was destroyed. these air strikes will be intensifying in the coming hours. that's been the pattern. there's also been palestinian rocket fire coming out of gaza into southern israel. the fear that grips the people here is on
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)